‘Prison Break’ revival in spring

RISONBRKA-860x450_c

It’s no longer a secret that “Prison Break” is coming back to bring brand new episodes for season 5. It was announced back in August 2015 by Fox Studios. The question though is when it might start airing. According to a report by The Indian Express, the series revival, which will be a 10-episode season, is set to start shooting in the spring.The show will bring back main stars Wentworth Miller, who played as Michael Scofield, and Dominic Purcell, who played as Lincoln Burrows.

 

PRISON BREAK

 

Sara-Tancredi-Prison-Break-tv-female-characters-15303822-265-400“There are a lot of moving parts to that conversation. But we are hopeful that we’ll be able to shoot something this spring. ‘Prison Break’ is taking its cue from Legends, which is the priority. So we’re aiming for spring,” Miller said.
The revival was announced back in August last year by Fox Studios.
Apart from the two lead stars, Sarah Wayne Callie is also expected to reprise her role as Sara Tancredi.

 

No premier date has been announced yet. However, if the shooting begins as per schedule, the show may go on air by the end of this year.

 

This article was originally published in the indianexpress.

HBO gives season six of Game of Thrones and official premiere date

Game-of-Thrones-Season-6

Game-of-Thrones-Season-6

It’s the most pirated show for years now, and feels like one of the most anticipated shows season to season: it’s HBO’s adaptation of George RR Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire novel series called Game of Thrones. You know it, you love it, you’ve been obsessing about when you get to find out what happened to Sansa after she jumped over that very high wall. Fret no more, weary traveler of the Narrow Sea of the off-season, we can see the shore beyond! Game of Thrones season six will premiere Sunday, April 24.

 

 

jonsnow-590x330The finale of last season of Game of Thrones got the highest ratings of the entire series by that point with 8.11 million viewers, even though it aired opposite some NBA Finals game.

It’s unsurprising to those following Song of Ice and Fire fandom because that episode’s place in the series meta narrative made it exciting to all types of fans. For those who just watched the show, the fifth season’s tail end was riding on the Jon Snow high that was the finale battle sequence of the episode “Hardhome” where Jon barely saved some wildlings from the oncoming White Walkers, the Night’s King, and his army of Wights. For the people who have read fifth Martin book, A Dance With Dragons, the show was finally catching up with the novel’s narratives, which meant a major event was about to go down that has also been left unresolved in the book:Jon Snow’s apparent death.

 

Game-of-Thrones-303195Since the show went off the air at a high point in terms of exposure, book readers and show watchers were finally asking the same questions by the millions. HBO and A Song of Ice and Fire’s publishers hatched a plan to get Martin to finish the sixth book in time for it to be published before Game of Thrones premiered the new season. This was supposed to the let the author conclude what could very well be his final cliffhanger considering how fast the show is consuming the chronology of the novels.

 

game-thrones-season-5Sadly, Martin couldn’t finish in time. The author broke the news to the fans himself by blogging about it, but by then HBO had released a teaser for Game of Thrones’ upcoming season — a forty-one second teaser that includes the phrase “the past is already written, the ink is dry.” Now we’ll forever be wondering if the inclusion of that line was a subtle hint that the book was supposed to be done by the time the season came out, or if it was placed over video of Kit Harrington as an alive Jon Snow to continue to troll audiences with the question of his death and/or magical resurrection.

 

This article was originally published in geek , We don’t own any copyrights of this article.

 

‘Sherlock: The Abominable Bride’ Recap

sherlock..

sherlock..It’s rare that a series gets to do an adaptation of its own adaptation, but that’s exactly what writers and creators Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss achieved with the Christmas Special episode Sherlock: The Abominable Bride. Subverting their own subversion, they catapulted Sherlock Holmes (Benedict Cumberbatch) and John Watson (Martin Freeman) back to the time of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s source material, in order to tell a one-off Victorian tale that was, prior to its premiere, shrouded in mystery.

 

And now, of course, it all makes sense (right?) and that reality is a little disappointing. “It’s all a dream” (or a drug-induced mind-palace-dwelling hallucination) is one of the most groan-worthy ways for any story to conclude, and even though Sherlock: The Abominable Bride ping-ponged back and forth through time, it felt like too neat of a cheat.

aaAt the start, The Abominable Bride was absolutely delightful as an alt-history, meta-infused version of the Sherlock we know and love. Back in the 1880s, with Watson as the storyteller and Sherlock Holmes sporting the iconic deerstalker, there were some fun twists on the Sherlock-Watson origin story from this iteration’s premiere (all the way to the mirrored, vintage title sequence). Mycroft (Gatiss), as some sort of suicidal balloon, was also a silly and fun changeup (and more like the original stories), as was the usually quiet and retiring Molly Hooper (Louise Brealey) turning up as a curt and confident crossdresser. Mrs. Hudson (Una Stubbs), though, remained her timeless self, and Lestrade (Rupert Graves) didn’t change much either.The show also gave a few moments to some other memorable cast from the past, like Anderson (Jonathan Aris) and Irene Adler (Lara Pulver, in a locket photo), though only in passing.

sherlock  All of this was much more fun than the actual case, the solution of which was telegraphed fairly early through Mary’s (Amanda Abbington) arrival at Sherlock’s flat. As a mysterious, cloaked figure dressed in black, she wasthe dark shadow of the murderous Bride dressed in white, and the episode’s heavy-handed themes of gender inequality set the stage for what exactly? A feminist death cult?

Though Mycroft and Sherlock both explain away the women’s killer intentions (and successes) as “progress,” one can’t help but be disappointed by the implications. Still, the real sin of The Abominable Bride was that it just wasn’t a particularly good case. And part of it may have been because of its truncated timeline, due to the show’s other ghost.

 sherlock-abominable-bride-slice-600x200

I will be the first to stand in praise of Andrew Scott’s weird and wonderful portrayal of Professor Moriarty, but the show has made him into something of an albatross. By killing him off (which perhaps happened too soon), the series was left without its principal villain and foil. And yet, Sherlock also won’t let him go. Moriarty is best used sparingly, be it as a mastermind or a spectre, and The Abominable Bride was much too indulgent with his presence. Knowing, ultimately, that he really is dead (that it’s not a trick on Sherlock) made his reappearance feel more like a trick on us, and one that won’t hold up well on rewatching. The idea that Moriarty still haunts Sherlock’s mind is an interesting one, and Watson being the one to “save” Sherlock was a nice touch, but the theatrics in between felt overwrought (with the time perhaps better spent on other things).

 watsonSherlock is at its best when it’s snappy, clever, and fun, which its first act achieved in spades (the sign language scene was a particular highlight, as were the parlor scenes). If the Christmas Special had just stuck to being a weird, unexplained alternative history of our cast, it would have been just fine. (As it was, the Victorian setting was an opportunity to pack in almost every Sherlock Holmes reference possible — a nice set of easter eggs for fans). Using it as a bridge between Seasons 3 and 4 didn’t work quite as well, though, even as tantalizing as some of the Moriarty twists first seemed.

Still, there are some interesting portends for fans to pick apart leading up to the new season: Moriarty is dead, but his influence lingers (and Sherlock knows how), and a glimpse into Mycroft’s notebook divulged a few points of interest into what might be coming next (a reference to Sherlock’s childhood dog Redbeard, as well as ”611174,” “Vernet,” and “Scarlet Roll”).

sherlock (1)

Back to Bride – Cumberbatch, Freeman, and the entire cast were all as charming and lovable as ever, of course, and managed to elevate scenes that were otherwise miscalculations. They were ultimately let down, though, by the Special’s time-jumping structure, and its endless fascination with Moriarty. As interesting as that relationship can be, it can’t hold a candle to the one between Sherlock and Watson. After Watson booted Moriarty off the cliff, he commented, “it was my turn.” As well it should be. Sherlock then dove off the cliff himself, and back into the present. There’s no more time to dwell on the past. The game is afoot.

 

This article was originally published in Collider, We don’t own any copyrights of this article.